Curious-Thailand-Traffic-Facts

Curious Thailand Traffic Facts

When you pressure in Thailand, the guidelines change, and some of them are quite curious. Here is a collection of driving and visitors tidbits, a little tongue-in-cheek, however still statistics of life in Thailand.

Q: How many people healthy on a small scooter in Thailand?

A: 3 or four is no longer uncommon, however I have seen 5. Only two are legal, through the way, however no one cares about that. One friend of mine, after studying my article, instructed me he had considered 7 on one bike. Now that is truely rare!

Q: What form of helmet is the most famous in Thailand?

A: The one that prevents you from getting a fine. This is commonly a exceptional low-cost proforma helmet which charges about $3.- or 4.- God forbid you need it to guard your self in an accident.

Q: Why do so many Thais no longer wear a helmet on their motorbikes?

A: For the female – it messes up their hair. For the guys – it is not cool. Helmets value money. Helmets get stolen. As you see there are many exquisite reasons no longer to wear one.

Q: Is there a law in Thailand that requires you to put on a helmet?

A: Yes there is. Here in Chiang Mai the first-rate is 400 baht, or about US$12.- In truth few people pay that since you can regularly slip the cop one hundred baht, or US$3.-, and the hassle is solved. You spend much less cash and the cop supplements his meager salary. Everyone happy.

Many riders keep a helmet in their little basket in front of the handlebar so they can put it on if it looks like there is a police test ahead.

Q: Do the cops give up motorbike riders who do not wear helmets?

A: It depends on the area. In Bangkok the policies are exceptionally strictly enforced. In many rural areas they are now not enforced at all. Here in Chiang Mai you frequently see a entire group of police at an intersection and they end each single bike rider barring helmet. But this happens solely at some stage in the reliable stop-the-helmetless-riders hour. As quickly as the law enforcement officials depart their respectable ticket-writing venture and continue with their ordinary duties, they could not care less if you wear a helmet or not. You may want to be driving a little moped with 4 people on it and no helmet anywhere in sight, and the equal cop who simply stopped everybody at the intersection, pulls up next to you at the mild and does not even blink an eye. It is sincerely selective enforcement.

Q: Do you need a drivers license to power a motorcycle in Thailand?

A: Yes you want a license, but many drivers just don’t trouble getting one. After all it is a hassle. You have to take a test, spend money, learn the regulations – so why bother. In most instances the check does now not make absolutely everyone a better driver anyway. In Thailand most 12 yr olds are capable of driving a small motorbike, and I have viewed even younger ones drive. Legally you have to be 15 years historical to drive a bike.

I be aware of people who have been driving their bikes for a long time except a license. If they get stopped by way of the cops, they will be asked for their license. But if you do not have one, you just pay a little great and it truly is it. Car drivers however generally do have using licenses.

Q: Whose fault is that accident?

A: In most cases whoever has the greater automobile has to pay. If a truck hits a car, the truck is at fault until the auto is so blatantly incorrect that the truck driver may want to no longer keep away from the accident. If a vehicle hits a motorbike, the vehicle driver is robotically at fault even if the motorcycle driver did some thing completely incorrect and illegal. Don’t ask me to explain that one!

Q: Pedestrian only traffic lights – do you have to stop?

A: Theoretically yes. In exercise most drivers will quit if they see anybody attempting to pass the road. If they don’t see all people they will simply power through the pink light.

Q: Do motorbikes get stolen easily?

A: Yes, it is a booming business. Since most of the bikes are small and light, two men can effortlessly grasp one of them and throw it in the back of a pickup truck. Your lock does now not assist at all. The bikes can be offered easily in areas with little or no police presence or abroad to Burma, Laos or Cambodia (neighboring 1/3 world countries), or they can be stripped down and offered as parts. My answer is to force a bike that is so heavy that it takes at least 4 guys to raise it. I hope it helps. By the way, you can’t buy theft insurance plan for motorbikes when they are greater than two years old.

In summary, visitors guidelines in Thailand range from the west. Some may additionally sound strange, but as soon as you get used to these regulations or idiosyncrasies, you can force right here with no problem. I have been using in Thailand for 10 years accident free. Knock on wood!

Leave a Reply